Find here useful tips to help us cope with this period of crisis. It doesn't matter where we are

Telecommuting

[Webinar] The keys to a productive telework

By Professor Rocío Pastor.
Ceasing to be a privilege, teleworking has become a necessity in recent weeks. Social isolation measures, regarding COVID-19, have forced many companies to opt for this modality regardless of how well prepared they and their collaborators were, for the challenge of working from home. Learn in this webinar the best techniques to achieve a highly productive teleworking and the myths and benefits that this entails.

Download here the document "The keys to a productive telecommuting | How to dismantle the myths of virtual work while maintaining focus and raising performance."which complements and summarizes this webinar.

Recommendations for a productive telework

  • 1. Define an exclusive space that ensures concentration

    Select an exclusive place to work. Although it sounds attractive to move around different spaces in the house, depending on the time of day or according to the mood, it is important to define an exclusive place to work. Doing so allows you to draw boundaries between your work life and your personal life.

    At first, one usually enjoys working in the spaces that are usually dedicated to leisure, rest or entertainment. However, abusing it or making it the rule can lead you to lose appreciation for these sites, blurring the boundaries that are necessary for balance of life.

    On the other hand, for a greater focus on our tasks, our brain needs to identify when we are in "work mode" and when we are in "personal life mode". This is most important when working from home.

  • 2. Organize your space with everything you need

    Have everything you need on hand. In the place of your home that you have defined to work, organize and have at hand everything you need for the development of your work. From documents, devices and chargers to water to hydrate you.

    The fewer distractions you have, the better your focus will be. Getting up all the time to look for things distracts your concentration. For the same reason, let those who live with you know your work hours and the times when you could attend requests or conversations.

  • 3. Learn the proper use of technological tools

    Make technology your ally. It is never too late to learn to use technology, especially when today we depend on it to continue achieving the results, in a timely manner, that are expected of us. The first thing is to make sure you have a good internet connection. The second, learn to use or lose fear of the tools that facilitate interactions and coordination with colleagues, bosses and clients.

    The new technological solutions and digital platforms are very friendly, easy to use. And when teleworking, part of the responsibility we assume is to use the tools properly and comply with the protocols that have been agreed for their use.

  • 4. Keep the same routines as when you go to the office

    Act the same as if you went to the office. Following the same routines facilitates focus and concentration because our brain likes repetition, habits, and stability.

    Our brain needs to identify when we are in "work mode" and when we are in "personal life mode". To maintain borders and avoid confusion, the best recommendation is that you maintain the same routines that you carry out when you are in the office: from the time you shower, have breakfast and turn on your computer until the time you have lunch or take breaks to recharge energies. From the way you organize your priorities at the beginning of the day, to the way you review your progress throughout the day.

  • 5. Agree with your boss rules, conditions and exceptions

    Negotiate availability and exceptions. One of the dangers of teleworking is the blurring of the boundaries between work and non-work, between work and other facets of life.

    As a collaborator, one must know how to set limits and exceptions. When we telecommute, the best thing is to mentally program ourselves to recognize that we are working as if we were in the office, but from our home. Our dedication to work, therefore, should be 100%. In the same way we should proceed when it comes to our personal or family life, without interrupting important moments because an email arrived or our boss, a supplier or a client called us.

    It is not about not attending to emergency situations or not doing what we should do. It is about reaching clear and concrete agreements with your boss, regarding exclusions and regarding the mechanisms for monitoring and / or reviewing your progress.

  • 6. Check your devices and / or messages from time to time

    Check your messages and devices. Do not disconnect. Although it sounds like common sense, the only thing different is that now you are doing your work from home. And that by not seeing you or having you close in person, your boss may experience some uneasiness or discomfort. So ensuring availability for your inquiries and calls, within reason, is key to reducing the level of uncertainty. Recommendation: agree with your boss exceptions.

    Because it is one thing to agree that you will not be checking messages, for a few hours, to focus on a key deliverable and another not to attend -with or without intention- your emails or WhatsApp messages throughout the day. Being aware of answering calls or requests is even more important when working virtually.

  • 7. Determine the three non-negotiable priorities for each day

    Select your priorities or critical tasks. When working from home, a good balance between self-determination and discipline boosts productivity.

    Without a clear roadmap, it is very likely that you will not be able to take advantage of the time or differentiate between the urgent, the important and the priority. So start each day by listing your tasks, objectives, and goals. If this is the case, talk to your boss to define priorities or, better yet, define them with him at the end of the day before. This way, both of you will know each day that you will be focused.

    Once your priorities are clear, dedicate yourself to them, avoiding distractions. Not all the tasks that we carry out we love. And precisely those that we tend to procrastinate are the tasks that we like the least, although we are clear about their criticality. Don't let this happen to you, that's why selecting an exclusive place to work and having everything you need on hand is key to staying focused and achieving the productivity expected of us.

  • 8. Start the day with a ritual that puts you in “work mode”.

    The day begins with a ritual. What rituals do you use to start the day? There are those who find it useful to make a to-do list, before turning on their computer or opening their mailbox. Other people prefer to drink coffee in silence before starting their tasks. If you already have rituals to start your day, keep doing them. If you don't have them, define which ones are the most appropriate to energize you.

    Following routines and rituals will help you not lose rhythm, which can happen when we work from home. The rituals will also allow your brain to differentiate when you are entering "work mode."

  • 9. Take active breaks to energize you, several times a day.

    Get energized throughout the day. Spending much of the time at home without moving impacts our mental health. The same applies when we are in the office, although sometimes we are not aware of it.

    Add, in your routine, if you do not have them, small rituals or breaks to increase your well-being and raise your energy levels. Open your eyes to the possibilities, depending on the space you live or are in: look out the window for a few minutes, make yourself a hot drink, take a deep breath, listen to your favorite song, take a look at photographs that bring you good memories. , water that pot that you have forgotten, open the personal chat to greet someone.

    These little moments, or energizing pauses, can make a big difference in your productivity, if you have the self-determination not to unduly prolong them. In other words: do not sin by excess or by default. 5 minute breaks every hour can be a good compromise.

  • 10. Privilege video in your conversations and conferences.

    Instead of just audio, use video! . Seeing your colleagues or clients and having them see you, even through a screen, brings greater proximity and motivation. Whenever you can, bet on video conferencing and activate the video mode, do not limit yourself to the audio function.

    It is something new for many of us, but it is worth it. Not playing the audio could generate mistrust. But, more than for that, the best reason is to convey closeness. Keep the link. Ensure warmth. Let them see us, see the other.

    In the virtual environment, the key is not in the distance but in the people and, therefore, in the way we manage our relationships, using the appropriate tools and resources, at the appropriate times.

  • 11. When communicating, take care of your gestures and body language

    Pay attention to your gestures, take care of them. When working remotely, we must pay more attention both to our body language and gestures and to the body language and gestures of other people. And for this, video is the best tool. Do not deprive yourself of information that can be vital to sustain the quality of your relationships: with your boss, colleagues, clients, suppliers, etc.

    Seeing your colleagues or clients and having them see you, even through a screen, brings greater proximity and motivation. Whenever you can, bet on video conferencing and activate the video mode, do not limit yourself to the audio function. Observe the movements and gestures of the other person. Ask appropriate questions when the time comes. A facial expression can tell us when to ask, stop, or just listen to the other person.

  • 12. Print closeness and warmth to your tone of voice

    Take care of the tone of your voice. When working from home, or remotely, it is when we must pay the most attention to both our tone of voice and our body language. The way we express ourselves is part of the message we deliver.

    And necessarily, to generate and / or maintain credibility there must be congruence between both elements: what we say and the way we say it. Learning to modulate our voice to convey closeness, warmth, empathy, is key when teleworking.

    We transmit a lot of information through our voice. Our interlocutors also transmit information to us with their voice. This is why active listening is critical when working virtually.

  • 13. Dose contact with family and friends

    Prevent your personal life from invading your work side. When working from home, it is best to mentally program ourselves to recognize that we are working as if we were in the office, but from our home. Our dedication to work, therefore, should be 100%. In the same way we should proceed when it comes to our personal or family life, without interrupting important moments because an email arrived or our boss, a supplier or a client called us. Although it is clear that there are exceptions.

    So for the sake of your productivity, dose the tools you use to keep in touch with friends and family. Define at what times of the day you will activate them. Otherwise they will end up becoming a distraction from your productivity and focus.

  • 14. End the day with a ritual to go into “personal life mode”.

    End the day with a ritual. What rituals do you perform to help your brain distinguish that you are moving into "personal life" mode? While some people are happy to check off all the tasks they have completed, others firmly close their computer to emphasize that their workday is over.

    As with the rites of beginning the day, when working from home, it is also critical to mentalize ourselves for the transition between work and personal life.

    Following routines and rituals will help you not lose rhythm, which can happen when we work from home. Doing so will also help you disconnect when you are done with your workday. This does not mean that you are not available to attend to emergencies. But it helps you to disassociate your personal life from your work life.

  • 1. Define an exclusive space that ensures concentration
  • 2. Organize your space with everything you need
  • 3. Learn the proper use of technological tools
  • 4. Keep the same routines as when you go to the office
  • 5. Agree with your boss rules, conditions and exceptions
  • 6. Check your devices and / or messages from time to time
  • 7. Determine the three non-negotiable priorities for each day
  • 8. Start the day with a ritual that puts you in “work mode”.
  • 9. Take active breaks to energize you, several times a day.
  • 10. Privilege video in your conversations and conferences.
  • 11. When communicating, take care of your gestures and body language
  • 12. Print closeness and warmth to your tone of voice
  • 13. Dose contact with family and friends
  • 14. End the day with a ritual to go into “personal life mode”.

Keys for Teleworking

  • Define and organize an exclusive space for work

    Clearly delimiting your workspace and organizing it is the key to separating the boundaries between your work and personal life.

    It sounds attractive to move around different spaces in the house, depending on the time of day or according to the mood. But stop. If you aspire not to blur the boundaries between your work life and your personal life, this is not advisable. For a greater focus on our tasks, our brain needs to identify when we are in "work mode". This includes everything from the space in which we work to the way we dress to begin our tasks.

  • Make technology your best ally

    Familiarizing yourself with and properly using the tools that have been defined is the key to maintaining fluidity in communication and coordination.

    It is never too late to learn to use technology, especially when today we depend on it to continue achieving the results, in a timely manner, that are expected of us. The first thing is to make sure you have a good internet connection. The second, learn to use or lose fear of the tools that facilitate interactions and coordination with colleagues, bosses and clients.

  • Adopt the same routines as when you go to the office

    Our brain likes repetition, habits, stability. Keeping the same routines helps us focus and concentration.

    When working from home, try to keep the same customs and hours as when you are in the office. This includes from the time you bathe, exercise, eat breakfast, read the newspaper, eat a snack, lunch and dinner; as well as the other little rites that make up your work routine, including the way you plan the day.

  • At the beginning of each day, plan and define priorities

    Without a clear roadmap, it is very likely that you will not be able to take advantage of the time or differentiate between the urgent, the important and the priority.

    Self-determination and discipline. When working from home, a good balance between these two ingredients boosts productivity. It is not very different from when you go to the office. Only that when you work from home, it is known that travel hours will be saved and that consequently, you have a larger inventory of hours. This increased availability of hours can lead you to two unhealthy extremes. One is to work more than necessary. The other, delaying or procrastinating tasks, especially those that we do not enjoy.

  • Throughout the day take energizing breaks

    Doing breathing exercises, stretching and active breaks, several times a day, helps to fill the energy stores. Turn these breaks into rituals!

    Spending much of the time at home without moving impacts our mental health. The same applies when we are in the office, although sometimes we are not aware of it. Add, in your routine, if you do not have them, small rituals or breaks to increase your well-being and raise your energy levels. Open your eyes to the possibilities, depending on the space you live or are in: look out the window for a few minutes, make yourself a hot drink, take a deep breath, listen to your favorite song, take a look at photographs that bring you good memories. , water that pot that you have forgotten, open the personal chat to greet someone.

  • Print greater warmth and closeness in your interactions

    Taking care of the frequency, precision and clarity of communication is something that we must take extreme when we work remotely.

    Working remotely doesn't have to create isolation or weaken your relationships. Again, this is up to you. And at this point, whether our personality tends towards extroversion or introversion, we must all make a conscious, deliberate effort to maintain the quality of our relationships with colleagues, bosses, clients, suppliers and other people with whom we interact. throughout the day.

  • Define and organize an exclusive space for work
  • Make technology your best ally
  • Adopt the same routines as when you go to the office
  • At the beginning of each day, plan and define priorities
  • Throughout the day take energizing breaks
  • Print greater warmth and closeness in your interactions

Myths of Telework

  • Telecommuting only works for introverts

    Our degree of introversion or extroversion can lead to confusion regarding the ability to work virtually, although in reality it should be neither a limitation nor an advantage. Who is fundamentally dependent on doing it and doing it well without suffering a feeling of isolation or giving in to countless distractions is up to oneself.

  • Teleworking is for young technology-prone people

    Technology is becoming more and more friendly for people of different ages, even the oldest. It is possible that some of you have a cybernetic granny who has shared with you, with the ease of an expert, more than one tip. Maybe they also know someone much younger, about the grandmother, who seems denied for technology. There is everything.

  • Any place is good for teleworking

    The most trite image, which does a favor to teleworking, is that of a person with his computer in some idyllic and secluded beach. I do not deny that it may be working. But the truth is that telework demands minimum physical, technological and even mental requirements. The minimum is an adequate internet connection, plugs to charge the machine and a good dose of concentration and discipline.

  • When teleworking, people take the opportunity to combine work tasks with personal matters

    It is a temptation, it cannot be denied. However, working from home should be this: working from home. Point. And not anything else. Giving your best when working from home is incompatible with putting the washing machine to work, attending unexpected visits or shopping at the supermarket.

  • When teleworking you work much less

    To support this myth, several hackneyed arguments are often used, the most common being that people have many more distractions at home. But what about the hallway conversations in the offices? The meals that drag on? The colleague who interrupts you several times a day and who seems to have a lower workload than yours? Snack and coffee? The endless and often unproductive meetings? The people who start to get ready to leave about 15 minutes before departure time?

  • By teleworking you become your own boss

    That distance does not deceive us. Telecommuting does not eliminate a company's hierarchy or chain of command. By working from home, therefore, you don't become your own boss. In other words: one cannot change the work schedule without consultation or decline the virtual meeting to which the boss summoned us, unless we have a very good reason for it. If we are asked to prepare an urgent report by tomorrow, we cannot decide not to do so either.

  • Telework induces isolation and loss of relationships

    By itself, teleworking does not have the power to cause isolation or weakening of relationships, nor does it have the power to impair coordination or communication. As the old saying goes: "The cold is not in the blankets." In the virtual environment, the key is not in the distance but in the people and, therefore, in the way in which people manage their relationships, using the appropriate tools and resources, at the appropriate times.

  • Telework means absolute availability: 24/7

    The opposite of the fact that teleworking reduces productivity is the increase in that this type of work is accompanied by permanent availability, even long after the working day has ended. As a collaborator, one must know how to set limits and exceptions. As a boss, one must learn to respect those limits and choose the exceptions very well.

  • Teleworking encourages individualism to the detriment of collaboration

    If a person lacks collaborative DNA, where they work from won't make much of a difference. In a similar way, a team will not be more or less collaborative by working virtually or by being grouped around the same table in a boardroom, keeping the distances that the coronavirus demands today.

  • We leave this myth in your hands

    If you have already worked from home in the past or belong to the group that has started to do so due to the COVID-19 emergency, you will have already suffered or faced in some way, in some proportion, several of the nine myths that you We shared.

    It is even possible that you have identified some myth especially relevant to you that is not on our list. We invite you to share with us what that myth is as well as the resources you have used to dismantle it. To do this, you can use the following link that contains 3 specific questions. 

  • Telecommuting only works for introverts
  • Teleworking is for young technology-prone people
  • Any place is good for teleworking
  • When teleworking, people take the opportunity to combine work tasks with personal matters
  • When teleworking you work much less
  • By teleworking you become your own boss
  • Telework induces isolation and loss of relationships
  • Telework means absolute availability: 24/7
  • Teleworking encourages individualism to the detriment of collaboration
  • We leave this myth in your hands

Tips for sharing

By the teacher Rocío Pastor

 In difficult and challenging situations, such as the one we are living with COVID-19, emotions tend to overflow and affect our mental health, impacting the quality of our decisions as well as the relationships and results we achieve.

The times we live in require sensitivity and resources to address crucial relationships, conversations and decisions, whether in our family environment or in our organizational environment. Our approach will be better to the extent that we take care of our well-being at an integral level: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual. With this objective we share 15 recommendations.

Campaign #CuidaTuSaludMental

  • Dialogue

    Talk about how you feel with your loved ones and support team. Listen to them too.

    Avoid isolating yourself, cultivate relationships. Talk to people you trust every day: family, friends and colleagues. Express how you feel. Listen to them. And whenever possible, it seeks to bring calm, tranquility and optimism. Put the technology on your side, use face time, email, WA, videoconference, telephone or other resources to keep in touch, give encouragement and support to yours. Supporting others helps us feel better. Invest in your close relationships and take the opportunity to recover relationships that you have abandoned.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Take breaks

    Do small activities throughout the day that produce well-being

    Do energizing activities. During the day, take small breaks that charge you with energy. Open your eyes to the possibilities, depending on the space you live or are in: look out the window for a few minutes, make yourself a hot drink, take a deep breath, listen to your favorite song, chine your pet, do stretching exercises, take a look at photographs that bring you good memories, water that pot that you have forgotten. Release endorphins: taking small breaks that recharge you with energy throughout the day.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Do not get infoxified

    Avoid falling into the over information, limiting the time you spend watching the news.

    Find out well and dose. Although it may seem like a trivial recommendation: when we are oversaturated with information, it is important to inform ourselves well and, in addition, to dose when we do it, especially if it affects us or hurts us. Therefore, use official channels such as the World Health Organization (WHO) or the health authorities of your country. Contrast information. Keep in mind that a lot of false information circulates. Don't help spread it. Also avoid falling into overinformation. This is called "infoxing." Being connected all day and aware of information about the coronavirus does not make one better informed or protect one more than others. What it can surely cause is an increase in the feeling of risk and vulnerability. For this reason, avoid programs or content that cause you discomfort or negativity or that resort to sensationalism or scaremongering. Precisely for mental health, the WHO recommends looking for information maximum once or twice a day ”. Don't go overboard.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Pull the humor and laughter

    Use respectful humor as a tool to combat anxiety.

    Smile and laugh. Laughter has always been and will continue to be a powerful resource to draw on, even in difficult and challenging situations. Humor is a key resource to maintain mental hygiene. The jokes and jokes that circulate on WhatsApp and social networks, when they are respectful, are excellent tools to combat anxiety and restlessness. Healthy humor - as the World Health Organization (WHO) has reiterated in recent weeks, is an emotion that helps keep fear at bay, without hurting other people. So make your own collection of funny memes and messages and turn to them in your low hours or moments. Go to funny videos or movies that have made you laugh and feel good the most. Or turn to people close to you who will awaken your sense of humor and inject optimism into you. Don't go a day without smiling.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Recognize your emotions

    Identifying and communicating your fears and fears helps release tension, as long as you don't adopt it as a mono-topic.

    Accept and share your emotions. Recognizing our emotions and feelings, identifying what triggers them (eg a news item, a video, a comment, etc.) is key. And talking about fear, our anxiety or fears with our close people and support team helps. As long as you don't let it become the only topic of conversation. The gasoline that fuels anxiety and fear are catastrophic thoughts. So, when fear threatens you, pay attention to what you are feeling, focus on the here and now, or do activities that relax you or redirect your emotions or thoughts.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Take care of yourself

    Relax with leisure activities and hobbies. Relax your body and your mind.

    Take care, take care and take care. This is no time for abandonment. Self-care has to go from the physical to the emotional. If you are at home: relax with those things you enjoy: deep breaths, stretching, washing your face, perfume, makeup, hydrate, feel the rays of even from your window ... whatever works best for you. Go to your favorite hobbies: reading, sleeping, watching TV, cooking, listening to music, playing cards. If you are working, from the office or from your home, maintain the usual routines to take care of yourself and take small breaks that generate well-being, throughout the day. Exercise regularly, sleep at your normal hours, and eat healthy. Forget going to the fridge every five minutes or staying in your pajamas all day, no matter how tempting it may be and as much as possible, seek a balance in the different facets of your life, taking into account the social: resort to virtual meetings, calls telephone, etc. Do not isolate yourself. As with any other infectious disease, a good way to protect yourself is to exercise healthy lifestyle habits to best maintain our immune system and our health in general.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Keep routines

    Establish and respect schedules that allow you to ensure, as far as possible, a certain normality.

    Establish routines and stick to them. Spending more time indoors, in a circumstance like the one we are experiencing, generates anxiety. Establishing routines helps reduce that feeling of restlessness. If you are working from home, try to keep the same customs and hours as when you are in the office. This includes from the time you bathe, exercise, eat breakfast, eat a “snack”, lunch and dinner; as well as the other small rites that make up your work routine. If you are working in the office, it is important that, as far as possible, you also maintain your routines and rituals as well. When the night comes, during the week, and on weekends: also set schedules. It extends the routines not only to teleworking but also to family and leisure activities. Our brain likes repetition, habits, stability. And in a situation like the one we live in: adopting and / or maintaining routines can be key to reducing feelings of anguish and restlessness, as well as negative stress.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • move on

    Take active stretches and breaks several times a day to maintain control and combat anxiety.

    Move alone or in company. Spending much of the time at home without moving impacts our mental health. The same applies when we are in the office, although sometimes we are not aware of it. You have to reserve a time every day to move. Performing, for example, stretching, active breaks and physical activity helps us maintain focus and combat anxiety, whether we are at home or at the office. Space should not be an obstacle. So get moving and get your endorphins high. Explore options: stretching exercises and functional exercises with your own weight (eg squats), zumba steps, yoga, jumping rope. Find an app that makes it easy for you to practice dance steps, yoga, cardio exercises. YouTube tutorial consultations. In short: get moving alone, with your partner or as a family!

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Use your experience

    Review the resources, tools and skills that you used in the past, in adverse situations. And use them.

    Go to your experience and your resilience. Faced with information overload and the impact of what is happening, negative automatic thoughts colonize our mind, generating anxiety and mental confusion. Although there are nuances according to each person, the truth is that this cognitive process, fueled by our fears, can take the form of irrational, catastrophic, apocalyptic thoughts. If your inner voice frequently begins to whisper, or even scream, fatalistic phrases such as: This will end very badly !; There is nothing we can do!; Where are we going to end ”; It will be the end! … Slow down and regain control of your mind. In the past, without a doubt, you faced difficult, challenging, complex situations. Ask yourself: How did you handle them? What resources, tools and skills did you use to overcome them ?; How did you control your anxiety ?; How did you manage your thoughts and your emotions ?; What did you do?; With what attitude? Once you have done your examination of how you dealt with emergency situations, take a look at what might work for you in the current situation. In every difficult event in our lives, we have grown stronger, we have learned. Call on your resilience. Do it optimistically.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Reinforce the positive

    Instead of complaining, focus on identifying opportunities and helping and honoring people you love.

    Instead of complaining, find opportunities. Now that we are spending more time in our homes - even with the situation we face and the uncertainty that this entails - it is possible to find well-being and happiness in little things that we could have been ignoring, due to the hectic pace in which we live. Go on a treasure hunt: watch the sunset, smell a flower, leisurely cook your favorite recipe, call your grandparents, draw, make origami, redesign your garden, play hide and seek with your children, teach your pet new tricks, invent recipes, view your family photo album. Remember the people who love you and who you love. What they have meant or mean in your life. Tell them. Live in the here and now. Reinforcing the positive. Finding yourself again, with your partner, with your children, with your friends. Thinking about the legacy you want to leave. Setting the example in your family. Becoming a model for your children of how to manage difficult times. In short: finding opportunities.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Support yourself

    Don't become a victim of the situation. Rather, choose to be part of the solution.

    Help and support yourself. Be part of the solution, helping or honoring those in the trenches fighting to save lives (doctors, nurses, health personnel in general) or those who make it possible for us to be supplied with medicines, food and other vital resources. Do not focus on the fact that you can not go out but on the reason why we must stay as long as possible in our house. Participate in all the acts of solidarity you can. Consciously avoid becoming a victim of the situation we are experiencing. Don't complain about being home. For not being able to leave. For not doing what you want or what you are used to. Rarely will we be able to help save lives, just by staying in our homes.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Thanks

    When you are grateful, your mind focuses on what you have and not on the negative or what you lack.

    Instead of saying thank you, be thankful. Showing appreciation is much more than just saying the conventional word "thank you." It is showing the other person that we really value and appreciate what they have done for us or what they have given us. When you are grateful: your energy increases, your emotions are more positive, your mood improves and your happiness increases because you realize all the good that has happened to you or what others have done for you. In addition, you are better able to modify your own attitude in the face of life and in the face of adversity. True gratitude helps us counteract the tendency we have as human beings towards the negative. So take a few minutes each day to really thank you from the heart for the learnings you have had, for the good things that happen to you or you receive from other people, even within the current circumstances.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Start or resume projects

    Keep your mind occupied, taking advantage of the time with those things or activities that you have left aside.

    Keep your mind healthy. Undertake new projects or take up the ones you have abandoned. Read that book that you have been pending for a long time. Take that overdue online course. Research a topic that you are passionate about. Find new hobbies. Make your garden. Check your cookbooks. Put that sewing machine or that “gadget” that you were given as a gift to work and that is collecting dust. Rearrange your closet. Clean your refrigerator. Get back your taste in writing. Play with your children. In short: put creativity to play in your favor and in favor of yours. Keep your mind busy.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Practice Mindfulness

    Focus on the here and now, what you can do and what is up to you.

    Live in the here and now. In circumstances like the ones we are living in, we tend to project ourselves into the future and expect the worst. Don't let negative automatic thoughts rule you. Don't give them space. The fuel that fuels anxiety is catastrophic thoughts. Instead, focus on everything you can do and everything you are doing to take care of yourself and your loved ones. Focus on those things that are under your control. An exercise when concerns arise: Explore the present moment. Breathe deeply and pay attention to the sensations generated by conscious breathing. Look at the ground. Look around you and see what you see, what you hear, what you can touch, what you can smell. Look at the objects, their colors, their textures, their details. Think about what you feel and all that you have and for what today, in this moment, you feel especially grateful. Then turn your attention to something else. Focus on what you have to do or what you were doing before worries and fears emerged.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Protect your privacy

    An optimal coexistence includes both closeness and affection as well as respect for privacy and the needs of each person.

    Find spaces for yourself. Coexistence 24 hours a day can become intrusive if limits are not set or commitments are defined. In our current condition, an optimal coexistence includes both closeness and affection as well as respect for privacy and the needs or routines of each person, whether it is your partner, children or other relatives with whom you live. So, if you are at home spending much more time than before with your partner, children or other family members, reserve intimate spaces for yourself, to immerse yourself in your own thoughts and emotions. To hear your voice. To breathe deeply. To recharge energy. And also find a way to distribute the loads of the house and the care of children or the elderly, if this is your case. The watchword: ensure quality time for you.

    #CareYourMentalHealth

  • Dialogue
  • Take breaks
  • Do not get infoxified
  • Pull the humor and laughter
  • Recognize your emotions
  • Take care of yourself
  • Keep routines
  • move on
  • Use your experience
  • Reinforce the positive
  • Support yourself
  • Thanks
  • Start or resume projects
  • Practice Mindfulness
  • Protect your privacy

Campaign #StayInHome

  • #Stay at home

    As long as possible!

  • #Stay at home

    Cooking

  • #Stay at home

    Training

  • #Stay at home

    Listening to music

  • #Stay at home

    Listening to Podcasts

    ¡Here you can listen to ours!

  • #Stay at home

    Talking by phone and video call with your loved ones

  • #Stay at home

    Playing as a family

  • #Stay at home

    Reading a good book

  • #Stay at home

    Cleaning and Tidying up spaces in the house

  • #Stay at home

    Sorting your cabinets and debugging

  • #Stay at home

    Painting and drawing

  • #Stay at home

    Practicing a musical instrument

  • #Stay at home

    Repairing things around the house

  • #Stay at home

    Planting plants in your garden

  • #Stay at home

    Taking online courses

  • #Stay at home

    I sell series and movies

  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home
  • #Stay at home